5 Things You Can Do if Your Job Hunt is Slowing Down

It isn’t easy to keep momentum going when you’re job hunting. There are many reasons, some seasonal (Christmas, summer holidays) and others because the job market is often cyclical and will create more jobs at some times and less at others.

The important thing is not to lose heart, especially if you’re waiting to hear feedback following applications or interviews.

Here are 5 things you can do to ease the frustration and keep momentum going…

 

  • Get Networking – Have you spoken to enough contacts? Ex-colleagues, other alumni and industry professionals can all open doors to new opportunities. Have you connected to everyone you’ve met on conferences and courses? Don’t forget to let friends and family know you’re job hunting – it may be difficult to say too much but they may well know people who can help you with introductions.
  • Brush up Skills and Industry Knowledge – Do you need to bring your knowledge up to date? Contacts may be able to recommend specialist reading, cheap refresher courses or free events that could help. Content sharing on social networking sites such as Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ offer an opportunity to build a library of interesting articles and blogs. Have you subscribed for blog updates and news feeds? Check that you are following all the ones that relate to your industry and skillset.
  • Revisit Your CV – There’s plenty of good advice out there for creating the sort of CV that employers are looking for so if you haven’t freshened yours up recently then now is a good time to do that. Also get someone else to take a look at it for you; preferably someone with recruitment experience but it could also be a friend or (ex) colleague who you know will give honest feedback. Even if you’ve had your CV looked over previously, fresh comments from someone who’s good at anticipating what an employer will think, can only be helpful. Remember to make sure that all your skills, capabilities and achievements are set out.
  • Arrange a Mock Interview – Whilst we’re on the subject of getting someone else to look at your CV, it could also be worthwhile getting one or two people you know to interview you too. It’s much better to practice with, and get feedback from, friends and family on those tough interview questions than to deal with them for the first time when you’re going for a job you’d love to get. If you are still in touch with an ex-boss or manager they may also be willing to do this for you. And don’t forget to brush up your answers to key questions by visiting our Be My Interviewer site.
  • Review Your On-line Presence – If you’re not already on LinkedIn, or haven’t joined groups or forums where potential employers might notice you, then take some time now to sign up and get involved. Read here for some tips to boost your profile. Have people recommended you on LinkedIn? Are people endorsing your skills? Now may be the time to ask, particularly a previous manager who can vouch for your achievements and effectiveness in the role. And if you’ve already got a good on-line presence, then it’s worth checking that your profiles are up to date. Do you need a more professional head and shoulders shot for your avatar?

Whilst it may be difficult to keep the positivity going at times, freshening things up can often lead to renewed impetus.

Let us know of any methods you’ve tried…