“What I did next..” Three stories of redundancy in the City

Work long enough in the City and, eventually, you will be made redundant. The question is: “what happens next?”

© Getty Images

Few sectors of the economy are as cyclical as financial services. For many, particularly those working in investment banking, redundancy is an occupational hazard. That doesn’t mean, though, that when the banking crisis of 2008 hit, City workers were ready for it.

So what happened to those people? Many returned to the industry, but just as many took the opportunity to make new starts.

“I felt like I’d been sacked for having a baby” #MaternityScandal

You always worry when you try to raise an issue that no one else seems to be talking about. What if it’s just me, you think. What if no one else cares?

© Getty Images

That’s what we felt when we launched our #MaternityScandal campaign. How wrong we were…

It started when a number of us in the office were talking about some figures showing that women had been hardest hit by the recession and were far more likely than men to be made redundant. “It’s not just that,” said one of us. “A friend of mine was made redundant

Maternity Scandal – story 7

The details of each of our interviewees have been altered in order to retain their anonymity.

Nicole, 32, from Cardiff

Where were you working at the time of your pregnancy?

“I was working for an international vehicle manufacturing company in a car sales role.”

Maternity Scandal – story 6

The details of each of our interviewees have been altered in order to retain their anonymity.

Lisa, 28, from Surrey

Where were you working at the time of your pregnancy?

“I was working at an educational recruitment firm when I became pregnant with my second child.”

Maternity Scandal – story 5

The details of each of our interviewees have been altered in order to retain their anonymity.

Amanda, 40, from Leeds

Where were you working at the time of your pregnancy?

“I was working part time at a television company as a senior casting assistant.”